Portal to the Lesser White-fronted Goose

- by the Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Goose project

Literature type: Rep.article

Language: English

Download:

Full reference: Aarvak, T. & Øien, I.J. 2018. Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus - Fennoscandian population. , Pp. 40-42 in Fox, A.D. & Leafloor, J.O. (eds.). A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic and Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations (Component 2: Population accounts). CAFF: Akureyri, Iceland. ISBN 978-9935-431-74-5.

Keywords: population status, Fennoscandia, Norway

Literature type: Report

Language: English

Download:

Full reference: Vougioukalou, M., Kazantzidis, S. & Aarvak, T. 2017. Safeguarding the Lesser White-fronted Goose Fennoscandian population at key staging and wintering sites within the European flyway. , Special publication. LIFE+10 NAT/GR/000638 Project, HOS/BirdLife Greece, HAOD/Forest Research Institute, NOF/BirdLife Norway report no. 2017-2. 164p.

Keywords: EU-Life, conservation, Norway, Greece, Finland, Hungary, Estonia, Lithuania,

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Biology Bulletin

Volume: 44 , Pages: 960–979

DOI: 10.1134/S1062359017080143

Download:

Full reference: Rozenfeld, S. B., Soloviev, M.Yu., Kirtaev, G.V., Rogova, N.V. & Ivanov, M.N. 2017. Estimation of the Spatial and Habitat Distribution of Anseriformes in the Yamal-Nenets and Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Regions (Experience from the Use of Ultralight Aircrafts). Biology Bulletin 44: 960–979 https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1134/S1062359017080143

Keywords: migration, monitoring, aerial counts, Russia, western Siberia, Yamal

Abstract:

In Russia, the conservation of anseriformes is possible through the creation of temporary huntingfree zones during hunting season, especially in spring. A justification for creating such zones and outlining their boundaries (by analogy with the experience derived from the countries on North America) each season must be based on data on annual waterfowl monitoring. The present paper describes census experience drawn from the use of ultralight aviation for further delineating the key staging sites of waterfowl in western Siberia. To refine the duration of monitoring, observation data were combined with those derived from geese equipped with GSM-GPS transmitters. In the spring and autumn of 2012–2014, we covered over 50000 km of aerial surveys of 25 waterfowl species. A new method is advanced for assessing their numbers based on visual observations, flock photography, and modern statistics. We estimated the species densities in 16 habitat types delineated on the basis of Landsat imagery. In terms of this, a system is proposed for extrapolating the survey data on 25 waterfowl species onto model sites in western Siberia. Drops in the numbers of several mass game species were noted. Based on an evaluation of the habitat quality, ten waterfowl hunting-free zones were suggested and delineated. A GIS project was launched that incorporated the main migration routes, boundaries of the key sites, places of mass bird aggregations, and sites for the observation of rare, Red Data Book. A program of long-term monitoring and sustainable use of waterfowl in the study region is offered. Such an approach must also be applied to other regions of Russia.

Literature type: General

Journal: Goose Bulletine

Volume: 22 , Pages: 17-24

Language: English

Full reference: Rozenfeld, S. & Kirtaev, G. 2017. Monitoring and identification of key sites of Lesser White-fronted goose (Anser erythropus) in Baydaratskaya Bay and adjacent territories. Goose Bulletine: 22, 17-24

Keywords: Russia, survey, Yamal Peninsula, Baydaratskaya Bay, ultra-light hydroplane, arial survey,

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Bird Conservation International

Volume: 27 , Pages: 355-370.

DOI: 10.1017/S0959270916000393

Language: English

Full reference: Karmiris, I., Kazantzidis, S., Platis, P. & Papachristou, T.G. 2017. Diet selection by wintering Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus and the role of food availability. Bird Conservation International 27: 355-370. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0959270916000393

Keywords: diet selection, food availability, diet composition, droppings, protein, Kerkini Lake, Echinochloa crus-galli, Cyperus esculentus, Scirpus lacustris, Ranunculus sceleratus

Abstract:

The Fennoscandian population of the Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus (LWfG) is on the verge of extinction and migrates from northern Fennoscandia to Greece on a regular seasonal basis. For the first time, diet selection was investigated during two years at Kerkini Lake, a wintering site in Greece. The relative use of LWfG’s feeding habitats was systematically recorded by visual observations of the LWfG flocks. Food availability was measured by the relative cover of available vegetation types while the diet composition was determined by the microhistological analysis of droppings. In addition, we determined crude protein, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre and acid detergent lignin content of the most preferred plant species by LWfG and all vegetation categories that contributed to LWfG diet in the middle of the duration of their stay at Kerkini Lake and after their departure from the lake. LWfG feeding habitat was exclusively marshy grassland in water less than 5 cm deep up to 300–400 m away from the shore. LWfG selected a diverse number of plant species (33), however, grass made up the 58% of their diets. The most preferred plant species were Echinochloa crus-galli, Cyperus esculentus, Scirpus lacustris and Ranunculus sceleratus. LWfG departed from Kerkini Lake in mid-December to the Evros Delta (Thrace, eastern Greece), when either food availability falls in very low levels or flooding occurred in their main feeding habitat. Consequently, as long as food and habitat resources are available for LWfG, it is very likely that the birds will winter mainly at Kerkini Lake and not at the Evros Delta, which will contribute to further minimisation of the theoretical risk of accidental shooting of LWfG at the latter wintering habitat. Thus, future conservation actions should primarily focus on the grassland improvement at Kerkini Lake enhancing the availability of food resources for LWfG (mainly grasses) and the protection of the feeding habitat from flooding.

Literature type: Report

Language: English

Download:

Full reference: Cuthbert, R. & Aarvak, T. 2017. Population estimates and survey methods for migratory goose species in Northern Kazakhstan. , AEWA Lesser White-fronted Goose International Working Group Report Series No. 5. Bonn, Germany. 96pp.

Keywords: population estimate, population size, survey, Kazakhstan, Russia, Kostanay, Kustanay, Akmola, North Kazakhstan,

Literature type: Report

Language: English

Full reference: Bragin, E. 2017. Technical report on the project "safe flyways: monitoring threatened waterbirds along Central Asian site network" supported by CMS Small Grant Program. , NGO Naurzum, report 25 pp.

Keywords: Kazakhstan, counts, 2015, Kustanay

Literature type: Report

Language: English

Download:

Full reference: Rozenfeld, S. (comp). 2016. Small-Scale Funding Agreement (2015-2) ‘Conservation of the globally threatened Lesser White-fronted goose’ Final report. , 102pp.

Keywords: Russia, satellite tracking, survey

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution

Volume: 101 , Pages: 303-313.

DOI: 10.1016/j.ympev.2016.05.021

Language: English

Full reference: Ottenburghs, J., Megens, H.-J., Kraus, R.H.S., Madsen, O., van Hooft, P., van Wieren, S.E., Crooijmans, R.P.M.A., Ydenberg, R.C., Groenen, M.A.M. & Prins, H.H.T. 2016. A tree of geese: A phylogenomic perspective on the evolutionary history of True Geese. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 101: 303-313. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2016.05.021

Keywords: Consensus, Concatenation, Gene tree, Hybridization, Incomplete lineage sorting, Species tree

Abstract:

Phylogenetic incongruence can be caused by analytical shortcomings or can be the result of biological processes, such as hybridization, incomplete lineage sorting and gene duplication. Differentiation between these causes of incongruence is essential to unravel complex speciation and diversification events. The phylogeny of the True Geese (tribe Anserini, Anatidae, Anseriformes) was, until now, contentious, i.e., the phylogenetic relationships and the timing of divergence between the different goose species could not be fully resolved. We sequenced nineteen goose genomes (representing seventeen species of which three subspecies of the Brent Goose, Branta bernicla) and used an exon-based phylogenomic approach (41,736 exons, representing 5887 genes) to unravel the evolutionary history of this bird group. We thereby provide general guidance on the combination of whole genome evolutionary analyses and analytical tools for such cases where previous attempts to resolve the phylogenetic history of several taxa could not be unravelled. Identical topologies were obtained using either a concatenation (based upon an alignment of 6,630,626 base pairs) or a coalescent-based consensus method. Two major lineages, corresponding to the genera Anser and Branta, were strongly supported. Within the Branta lineage, the White-cheeked Geese form a well-supported sub-lineage that is sister to the Red-breasted Goose (Branta ruficollis). In addition, two main clades of Anser species could be identified, the White Geese and the Grey Geese. The results from the consensus method suggest that the diversification of the genus Anser is heavily influenced by rapid speciation and by hybridization, which may explain the failure of previous studies to resolve the phylogenetic relationships within this genus. The majority of speciation events took place in the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene (between 4 and 2 million years ago), conceivably driven by a global cooling trend that led to the establishment of a circumpolar tundra belt and the emergence of temperate grasslands. Our approach will be a fruitful strategy for resolving many other complex evolutionary histories at the level of genera, species, and subspecies.

Literature type: Report

Language: English

Download:

Full reference: Morozov, V.V., Øien, I.J. & Aarvak, T. 2016. Monitoring and satellite tracking of Lesser White-fronted Geese from the Russian European tundra in Russia in 2015. , NOF-BirdLife Norway - Report 2-2016. 13pp.

Keywords: Polar Urals, Bolshezemelskaya Tundra, Bolshaya Rogovaya River, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Russia, production

Abstract:

Fieldwork was carried out between 6th June and 10th August 2015 at the western macro-slope of the Polar Urals and the eastern Bolshezemelskaya Tundra, Russia. In the Bolshaya Rogovaya River basin area, only one LWfG pair with five juveniles was located. However, the numbers of Bean Geese were high, with 92 adults and at least 58 juveniles in the same area. In the Polar Urals, Lesser White-fronted Geese were found on the rivers or watershed lakes in June, but repeated observations carried out in July and early August did not confirm the presence of LWfG, but also here many broods of Bean Goose were observed. Altogether, three broods of LWfG were found in one flock. One adult male was caught by a hoop net during fieldwork and equipped with a solar powered GPS satellite transmitter. This male LWfG migrated southwards along the Ob river valley, through Kazakhstan, but instead of crossing over to the western side of the Caspian Sea as expected, he was tracked to Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. This is the first time that a Lesser White-fronted Goose has been tracked to this probably very important wintering area which is situated in the border area between Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. By 7th January 2016 the bird was still alive and with a functioning transmitter.

Number of results: 535